Data Highlight: Michigan 2020 Job Vacancy Survey

Michigan’s Labor Market News released findings from the Michigan 2020 Job Vacancy Survey in their March 2021 issue. According to the survey, Michigan’s labor market had 184,000 job vacancies in 2020. The manufacturing industry had the second-lowest job vacancy rate in 2020, meaning there were 2.8 jobs open for every 100 positions filled. Of those job vacancies, approximately 60% required less than one year of experience, and approximately 85% require a high school degree or less.

However, despite being among the hardest hit industries during COVID-19, the manufacturing industry was able to recoup 156,800 of the 201,500 jobs lost during the shutdown in April 2020, as of January 2021. This trend reveals the resiliency of the industry and the opportunities available for job seekers. Read more.

Source: 2020 Michigan Job Vacancy Survey, Bureau of Labor Market Information and Strategic Initiatives, Department of Technology, Management & Budget

 

Masters of Mobility: Robots on the Road

A true testament to what partners make possible, one project kept inspiration alive for more than 300 robotics students during a time when face-to-face meeting was not possible. Due to COVID-19, many robotics experiences were interrupted. Robotics Alliance of Macomb, Macomb Intermediate School District, Macomb County Planning and Economic Development, and Square One Education Network came together to offer students the opportunity to build small robotic vehicles at home or in the classroom for the Masters of Mobility: Robots on the Road project.

Goals for participating students were two-fold:

  1. Develop skills associated with programming, information technology (IT), electrical and mechanical engineering by building vehicles that embody each of those concepts.
  2. Exposure to career pathways in the mobility industry with an emphasis on robotics, sensors, connected, and autonomous vehicle technology.

To provide a real-world experience, Square One Education Network worked with companies to collect and provide 381 robotic vehicle kits, 28 document cameras, 26 PRUSA 3D Printers, 24 hours of training, and two webinar events with industry leaders. This equipment and training allowed students to simulate real-world connected and autonomous vehicle technology by completing mission challenges in a virtual environment.

Carolyn Sauer, senior director for MICHauto had an opportunity to participate in the Dec. 17 webinar focused on manufacturing, saying, “For an industry that needs to quickly build up its workforce for skilled trades, manufacturing, and high-tech roles, like software engineering, this type of experience is necessary to fully engage students in the automotive and mobility field at a young age.”

Demonstrating that students can use their skills and passion for problem-solving and developing technology is important.  Allowing them to experience it takes it to the next level, opening their minds to a host of career possibilities right here in Michigan.

New Partnership Empowers MSU Women in Engineering

Originally published by Michigan State University Innovation Center.

By Tracy Henion

In a move to strengthen the journey among female engineering students, Toyota has partnered with Michigan State University on a mentorship program that builds upon its already strong ties to MSU’s Society of Women Engineers.

Toyota has a long history of supporting K-12 mentorship and STEM programs, but this is the first of its kind at the university level. As everyday technologies advance through autonomous, electric, connected, and mobility vehicles and systems, the timing is spot on.

“Toyota believes we can support the students’ knowledge of these technical areas as well as our personal experiences in the real world,” said Randy Stephens, a group vice president of Product Performance Engineering. “We hope to see students empowered by their collaboration with us.”

Not only is the partnership beneficial for students, but for Toyota’s future as they gain information and prepare for a new generation of engineers. It’s also an opportunity for all involved to launch a program with endless possibilities for expansion.

Given that it is the first year for the program, leaders wanted to start small, with 15 junior and senior engineering students participating. Each mentor was uniquely assigned to a mentee by using information provided based on personalities and interests.

Toyota mentors meet virtually with students at least once a month to discuss career options, challenges and skillsets while providing advice on how to present ideas to grow in the industry.

MSU’s engineering students learned about the program through their advisor, Judith Cordes.

Cordes was motivated by the idea of this program for two reasons. One, she and other advisors are always searching for ways to build on student involvement. “We know from our mentoring program, as well as many studies, that mentoring is a key component for continued success,” Cordes said.

Secondly, they were excited to start a program with corporate partners. Unlike other projects, this one has the ability to impact both MSU students and Toyota engineers.

That partnership was solidified by Brice Nelson of the MSU Innovation Center. As director of corporate partnerships, this kind of work is at the heart of Nelson’s role with Business Connect, a unit of the Innovation Center focused on corporate engagement.

“This is a great example of a corporate partner working with MSU to create a mutually beneficial program,” Nelson said. “The structured mentorship of this critical talent pipeline could very well position Spartan women to have a significant impact on the mobility industry for years to come.”

Jenny Lam and Isabel Woelke, both seniors at MSU, are notable examples of the type of students this program was designed to assist. Having taken on several leadership roles in their academic careers, they were motivated to find yet another way to progress as female engineers.

Both Lam and Woelke are involved with MSU’s chapter of the Society of Women Engineers, a non-profit educational service organization composed of science and engineering students and graduate engineers who work to recruit, support, and retain women in the engineering profession.

“I am always looking for ways to improve myself professionally and as a student, so I thought this was a good way to get out of my comfort zone and seek some extra help,” Lam said.

Woelke agreed, and said she finds value in connecting with a mentor to discuss career options, professional development opportunities, and day-to-day functions of being an engineer.

“We all have so much to learn from one another,” she said. “I’m just really grateful to be in a program like this.”

Lam has learned to take her mentor’s experiences and mold them into a way where she can apply them to her own life. “My goals for this mentorship are to really work on being a better leader and communicator, and that encompasses building my confidence as well,” she said.

Her mentor, Emily Khouphongsy, an MSU College of Engineering 2008 alumna, served as president of the Society of Women Engineers while a student at MSU. For the past decade, she has been a professional advisor to the group, and is proud to give back to the university by sharing her passion for mentoring.

“I believe we all face challenges as we learn and grow in all areas of life,” Khouphongsy said. “Part of the personal value of life’s challenges is then the opportunity we have to help others as they navigate the same things.”

Breaking Down the American Jobs Plan

President Biden outlined a $2 trillion jobs and infrastructure plan on Wednesday, March 31, that would make a significant investment in roads, bridges, telecommunications, and climate change. The American Jobs Plan includes many MICHauto priorities for workforce development, electric vehicle investment, and research and development.

However, the proposed tax increases would be counter-productive to economic recovery and competitiveness. MICHauto views this bill as a starting point for negotiations and recognizes that transformative infrastructure investment requires bipartisan consensus. In response to President Biden’s plan, MICHauto Executive Director Glenn Stevens released this statement.

“President Biden’s American Jobs Plan represents a transformative investment in Michigan and the United States’ advanced manufacturing and transportation future. MICHauto is broadly supportive of many elements in the plan, including the modernization of our roads, bridges, broadband, workforce development, and making research and development a priority. Michigan’s automotive industry is well-positioned and poised for significant growth. The proposed investment in an electric vehicle charging network and next-generation battery technology will be profoundly beneficial for the automotive industry, Michigan businesses, and workers.

The proposal to significantly raise business taxes is concerning. In the global battle to drive the future of mobility, returning to business tax rates that place American automotive and mobility firms at a global disadvantage will harm the very industry this proposal aims to bolster.

This is an opportunity for bipartisanship, and we encourage leaders from both parties to work together. MICHauto will continue to work with our congressional delegation to monitor this legislation and will continue to provide the perspective of the industry to policymakers.”

MICHauto outlines what is in the proposal below.

Public Infrastructure

  • $115 billion to revamp highways, roads, and bridges. The plan outlined 10 major and 10,000 smaller bridges in need of reconstruction.
  • There is $20 billion in the plan to improve road safety, including measures for cyclists and pedestrians.
  • The plan calls for $85 billion to modernize existing transit systems and help agencies expand to meet rider demand. This would double federal funding for public transportation.
  • The plan would invest $111 billion for clean drinking water, $45 billion of which would be used to replace the country’s lead pipes and service lines. The effort would reduce lead exposure in 400,000 schools and child-care facilities and improve the safety of drinking water.
  • The plan includes a $25 billion in airports, that would renovate terminals and expand car-free access to air travel.
  • Finally, there is $17 billion proposed for inland waterways, coastal ports, land ports of entry and ferries.
  • $80 billion to fix Amtrak’s repair backlog.

Electrifying Transportation

  • The plan provides $174 billion in grant and incentive programs for state and local governments and the private sector to build a national network of 500,000 electric-vehicle chargers by 2030.
  • The proposal would electrify 20% of the country’s yellow school bus fleet and help electrify 50,000 transit vehicles that are currently diesel powered.

Infrastructure for the Home and Local Community

  • The plan would provide for universal broadband, including to more than 35 percent of rural Americans who lack access to high-speed Internet.
  • Biden’s proposal would invest $213 billion to build and retrofit more than 2 million homes. The plan would build and rehabilitate more than 500,000 homes for low- and middle-income home buyers and invest $40 billion to improve public housing.
  • The plan includes $100 billion to upgrade and build new public schools, $12 billion in community college infrastructure, and $25 billion to upgrade child-care facilities.
  • $18 billion to modernize Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals and clinics and $10 billion to revamp federal buildings.

Worker Training and climate resiliency research and development

  • $180 billion for research and development that focuses on reducing emissions, climate resilience and boosting climate-focused research.
  • The plan would invest $50 billion in domestic semiconductor manufacturing.
  • The plan creates incentives for companies to locate local manufacturing jobs in the “industrial heartland.”
  • The plan would double the number of registered apprenticeships to more than 1 million and invest in a more inclusive science and technology workforce.

Next Steps

This proposal is only the start of a long process to pass a meaningful infrastructure package. Over the coming months, the MICHauto will continue to provide insight on what the bill means for Michigan businesses and residents.

MICHauto Statement on President Biden’s American Jobs Plan

In response to the Biden administration’s American Jobs Plan, MICHauto Executive Director Glenn Stevens released this statement.

“President Biden’s American Jobs Plan represents a transformative investment in Michigan and the United States’ advanced manufacturing and transportation future. MICHauto is broadly supportive of many elements in the plan, including the modernization of our roads, bridges, broadband, workforce development, and making research and development a priority. Michigan’s automotive industry is well-positioned and poised for significant growth. The proposed investment in an electric vehicle charging network and next-generation battery technology will be profoundly beneficial for the automotive industry, Michigan businesses, and workers.

The proposal to significantly raise business taxes is concerning. In the global battle to drive the future of mobility, returning to business tax rates that place American automotive and mobility firms at a global disadvantage will harm the very industry this proposal aims to bolster.

This is an opportunity for bipartisanship, and we encourage leaders from both parties to work together. MICHauto will continue to work with our congressional delegation to monitor this legislation and will continue to provide the perspective of the industry to policymakers.”

CEO Spotlight: Doerken’s Kent Anderson

Kent Anderson is the president of Doerken Coatings North America. MICHauto spoke with Anderson about his priorities and motivations as an automotive executive.

What is your number one priority as CEO?
Our highest priority is to continue on our path of creating and investing in an enduring, healthy culture – one which is based on fundamental values such as team-first, respect for one another, integrity, and trust. Each member of our team plays a critical role in our collective success. Alignment with our core values is essential to working together and ultimately meeting our objectives. The culture is intended to provide a foundation where each team member is empowered to create value and innovate within their respective roles. Establishing a culture based on trust, respect, and integrity enables each of our colleagues to have confidence to execute their plan to succeed. This process has a beginning, though no end. The greatest reward is seeing team members embrace these values in their lives and behaviors, in and out of the workplace.

What are you grateful for?
There are so many elements of my life to be grateful for, I could write a chapter on this topic alone. For brevity, certainly family, friends, and community top the list. Followed closely by the opportunity to work with a great team at Doerken Coatings in North America and globally. In addition, the industry relationships developed over many years have provided opportunities beyond expectation. It is through these relationships that I have had the privilege to work with many talented individuals who have shaped my life. It is from life experience that I have gained the insight, knowledge, and practical wisdom that I endeavor to apply and share with others today.

How do you keep your team motivated in the face of conflicts or obstacles?
Overcoming obstacles and challenges is a daily event. Over the course of my life and career, I have been fortunate to learn a few valuable lessons. Encouraging our team to maintain awareness during difficult challenges and conflicts is the first step in creating a solution. By becoming fully aware of the challenge we can collectively work to provide an effective solution. Along with gaining awareness of a situation, we encourage a “response” rather than a “reaction.” The point is to keep the issue in proper context, align necessary resources, and develop a solution. Clarity to the simple process motivates our team to be creative and solution-oriented.

What is your favorite car and why?
Chevrolet Corvette. Exceptional performance and value! True American sports car legacy.

CEO Spotlight: OneMagnify’s Mark Petroff

Mark Petroff is the president and chief executive officer of OneMagnify. MICHauto had the chance to speak with Petroff about what attributes he looks for in successful leaders.

Who do you look up to for inspiration or mentorship?
I have always found inspiration in the sailors who serve in our Navy – forward-deployed on the tip of the spear. From every corner of the United States, including Michigan, their stories have always resonated with me. Whether serving on a submarine, ship, or aviation squadron in peace or war, they represent America with incredible professionalism while sacrificing so much individually for the security of our nation. On my toughest days, I always reflect on the fact that there is likely a submariner three months into a six-month deployment giving and sacrificing far more than anything I can do in my day-to-day.

What are you grateful for?
I’m grateful for the opportunity to lead OneMagnify – serving our employees and clients. We have been able to build a team here that is focused on client service, while also creating a brighter workplace that values positivity, empathy, and most importantly, inclusivity. We recently launched our Unify team. Unify is focused on growing OneMagnify’s focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion. I am learning so much about creating a better company for all employees and have been grateful for the team’s initiative in launching Unify. We’ve signed up for the United Way’s 21 Day Equity Challenge and can’t wait to apply the best practices to our company.

What are the most important attributes of successful leaders today?
Given the dynamics of the pandemic, I have been emphasizing with my leadership team that they must approach every day with a mindset that is centered around being resilient and agile. But, as we move forward from the pandemic to address the automotive industry’s fundamental changes, we’re focusing on being empathetic to the consumer’s needs and innovative in driving solutions to not only meet their needs but also anticipate them.

What is your essential quarantine TV series, hobby, or book?
My wife and I have subscribed to every streaming service out there. Re-watching The Office and seeing Ted Lasso were our favorites early in the pandemic. I often get accused of channeling Ted Lasso and Michael Scott by my team. Recently, we added the Peacock Network just to get Yellowstone. It’s like HBO’s Succession, but set in the best that Utah and Wyoming have to offer. It’s a fun storyline with the eye candy of the West. A perfect escape from the drudgery and monotony of Zoom meetings!


Connect with OneMagnify:

linkedin.com/company/onemagnify/

facebook.com/OneMagnify/

Report: Michigan’s Mobility Industry Supported 1 In Every 5 Jobs In 2019

March 24, 2021

Detroit Free Press

By Adrienne Roberts

Nearly one in every five workers in Michigan was either directly or indirectly employed by the mobility industry in 2019, according to a report released Wednesday by the Detroit Regional Chamber’s MICHauto group.

The report looked to quantify the economic contribution of the state’s mobility industry — which includes automotive, transportation and other related industries — for the first time before the pandemic hit and decimated those industries, particularly in the second half of 2020.

The mobility industry is recovering, but unevenly, with goods-producing industries, like vehicles, starting to rebound. At the same time, many service sectors, including passenger transportation, haven’t recovered, the report said.

But the chamber wanted to measure the industry’s contribution before the pandemic to compare it with future years as the economy recovers.

Mobility encompasses the automotive industry but also includes rail, drones and other industries that include the movement of goods and people.

“With the way that transportation and the Internet of Things are all intertwined, particularly in a shared-use economy with Uber and Lyft, it’s a bigger umbrella,” said Glenn Stevens Jr., executive director of the Detroit Regional Chamber’s MICHauto program. “As transportation, electrification, connectivity, all these things come into more prominence, it’s a real economic opportunity.”

Key findings from the study include:

  • The mobility industry directly employed nearly 570,000 workers statewide, which supported an additional 526,000 indirect jobs, a total of almost 1.1 million jobs.
  • It directly and indirectly paid $71 billion in compensation (salary and benefits for payroll employees and the income of self-employed), for an average compensation of $65,000.
  • Directly and indirectly, it contributed $304 billion in gross economic output, 28% of Michigan’s gross economic output.
  • It directly and indirectly generated more than $9 billion in state and local taxes.

Within the mobility industry, the automotive industry was the largest contributing sector, directly and indirectly supporting nearly 684,000 jobs statewide, paying a total of $48 billion in compensation, and adding $230 billion to Michigan’s gross economic output.

“This sector of our economy is in everyone’s backyard,” said Stevens. “It pervades all the communities of Michigan and it’s across our entire state.”

He said it’s important that Michigan has an attractive business climate for this industry to grow. But he said that must coexist with the talent required for companies that are already here, or looking to move here.

“That is an evolving talent base, which is really going to depend on a lot of new skills,” he said. “They are digital skills, more and more.”

But first, the industry must recover after coming to nearly a complete stop during the pandemic. Trends that accelerated in the pandemic — such as working from home and the ability for companies to recruit for remote-only positions — could further impact the industry’s recovery. 

Employment in Michigan’s manufacturing industry is down nearly 8% in January compared with January 2020, according to the most recent data available from the Michigan Department of Technology, Management and Budget. Employment in trade, transportation and utilities is down 3%.

“One of the biggest issues right now is how we will work in the future,” Stevens said. “That had already been evolving, but the pandemic was a major inflection point for that.”

But he said the industry relies on communication and collaboration, which wouldn’t eliminate the office entirely.

“The industry itself has been evolving and will continue to evolve in the pandemic,” he said. “I think enabled it in a good way.”

View original article here.  

Mobility Industry Makes Essential Economic Contribution to Michigan

First-of-its-Kind Report Highlights the Mobility Industry’s Economic Impact

MICHauto released its 2021 Mobility Industry’s Economic Contribution to Michigan report on Wednesday, March 24, during the State of Automobility event. Glenn Stevens Jr., the executive director for MICHauto, presented key findings from the study and discussed the challenges and highlights for Michigan’s signature industry during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Defining Mobility

The report defines the mobility industry “as the production and distribution of goods and provision of services that support any movement of people and products.” The report highlights how many jobs are tied directly and indirectly to the mobility industry and the significant impact on the region’s overall economy. The report focuses on data from 2019, which was the last year of complete economic data, and includes an early analysis of how COVID-19 impacted the industry.

“The continuous transformation of automotive to a new mobility industry is an economic benefit to individual Michiganders, our region, and the state. Michigan must position itself to capitalize on the economic opportunity of mobility and lead with technology that solves global issues,” said Stevens. “We must utilize the auto industry as a platform for diversification, with mobility leading to an expansion of data science, robotics, artificial intelligence, and automation that positions Michigan for sustained economic growth.”

An Essential Contribution to Michigan

The report used data from 2019, the last full year of economic data that could accurately be measured, and an update on earlier MICHauto economic studies that only looked at the automotive sector. This year’s report defines the automotive sector as part of a growing mobility industry and offers a comprehensive assessment of the industry’s significant contributions to Michigan’s economy.

It is clear from the data how critical the mobility industry is for the state. Michigan’s mobility industry total economic output was $304 billion in 2019, which makes it larger than Germany’s $250 billion. That $304 billion represents 23% of Michigan’s gross state product, and more than 1.1 million jobs are either directly or indirectly tied to the industry. This is more than 25% of Michigan’s 4 million private-sector jobs. These are also some of the highest-paying jobs in our state. The average compensation for a worker in the industry is $65,000 compared with the state average of just under $30,000.

“It is clear from this report that the mobility industry is growing, and Michigan must utilize our head start as the automotive capital of the world,” said Stevens. “Transformational mobility will lead to an expansion of data science, robotics, artificial intelligence, and automation that positions the state for sustained economic growth.”

COVID-19’s Impact on the Industry

Stevens shared with the audience the challenges the industry has been through over the past year. However, he was quick to point out MICHauto’s leadership in helping safely reopen manufacturing and the resiliency of the industry. As a direct result of MICHauto’s lobbying, the state allowed a critical ramp-up period for automotive suppliers to safely and productively restart the industry’s supply chain.

MICHauto recognized that it was not enough just to lobby the Governor to open manufacturing. The industry had to be responsible for keeping automotive employees safe and our communities healthy. That led to the Mask Up Michigan and the Work Smart, Play Smart to Keep Manufacturing Open campaigns. Manufacturing reopened on May 11, 2020, and has stayed open since.

“The COVID-19 pandemic had a devasting initial impact on Michigan’s manufacturing; however, innovation and safety protocols allowed the automobility industry to safely reopen and lead a significant recovery for the state in the second half of 2020,” said Stevens.

The report was created in partnership with Public Sector Consultants and the Michigan Economic Development Corporation’s support.